Motorcycle safety

Motorcycle safety

Motorcyclists are six times more likely to be killed on the road than any other road user.

That’s a staggering fact. And while so many motorcyclists are some of the best drivers on our roads, there’s another significant cohort which are not. They are, by a vast majority, male. And younger road users – from 17-34 years of age.

983 fatal collisions occurred on Irish roads between 2008 and 2012, claiming the lives of 1,077 people. The RSA analysed An Garda Síochána Forensic Collision Investigation reports for 867 collisions in order to determine what caused or contributed to the collisions. Of these 867 collisions, 93 collisions involved a motorcyclist and claimed the lives of 96 people. A further 7 people were seriously injured.

Speed was a contributory factor in 49% of the 93 fatal collisions involving a motorcyclist

In this new campaign we want motorcyclists to recognise their vulnerability. That they have a responsibility to themselves and their families to ride safely. That speeding is lethal because if something goes wrong, there is no margin of error and the consequences can be catastrophic.

We’re painting a picture of a very specific kind of motorcyclist. One who loves speed, and doesn’t really think the rules apply to him. They have been told a million times to slow down or never ever drink and drive. Told by us, but also told by partners, friends and family. But these men just don’t listen.

It addresses exactly this kind of motorcyclist. It opens on a sign that says: “No-one likes being told what to do”. No one more so that this kind of motorcyclist. One raised on the motorcycle imagery of freedom and the open road. And who hasn’t yet been taught the lessons of experience.

We then see a series of signs – signs that tell us, to a greater or lesser extent, what to do. Annoying signs, that we kind of want to rebel against.

Then we see our most important one – an 80kmph sign, that a motorcyclist speeds past. There’s a crash, and the signs in the spot change drastically. No longer are they about trivial things like keeping off the grass – now they are signs intended for the Gardaí, paramedics, nurses, doctors… pathologists.
And finally, we see the human cost of not paying heed to this sign. A mother left holding a young child, after her partner has died.

It ends reminding this audience of a simple fact. That when you think that bikers speeding is a factor in half of motorcyclist deaths, sometimes you have to listen.

Ease off the throttle and keep within the speed limit.

The New TV commercial will air in English and Irish from Friday 4 August and is supported by radio, Digital, cinema and a social media campaign.

 

Previous Campaign

Previous campaigns include two TV adverts to highlight just how invisible motorcyclists are on the road, we make two short, lo-fi web films. Each one hinges on a surprising twist where we reveal that motorcyclists are invisible.

MAGICIAN:

We see a wannabe Derren Brown type of magician conversing with his son. The entire ad is shot from the perspective of the son who is holding the camera. They’re in a cluttered garage with a motorbike on its stand. Motorcycle leathers hang on the wall behind the bike. He says for his next trick, he’ll make himself disappear. He gestures his fingers towards and away from camera in a ‘magician’s manner’, before simply stepping onto the motorbike beside him. He suddenly disappears. The son sounds shocked as he moves the camera around the garage looking for a sign of his dad and the bike.

The most vulnerable person on the road is the one you can’t see.

We cut to the outside of the garage, the bike is up on its stand and the dad stands beside it fitted out in full bike leathers with a helmet under his arm.

Always check twice for motorcyclists.

HIDE AND SEEK

A girl and her dad are playing hide and seek in small backyard. The entire ad is shot from the perspective of the mum who is holding the camera. There’s a tiny tree, a slide and a motorbike parked against the fence. The girl is hiding behind the tree but it obvious where she is. Dad looks behind himself and walks around the slide looking for her. She is giggling. He finds her and gives her a big hug. It’s his turn to hide now and the daughter turns her back and counts. Dad jogs over gets on the motorbike and both him and the bike vanish. She turns and looks around surprised. She runs over and looks behind the tree hopefully.

The most vulnerable person on the road is the one you can’t see.

We cut to the front of the house, the bike is up on its stand and the dad stands beside it fitted out in full bike leathers with a helmet under his arm.

Always check twice for motorcyclists.

 

See the new campaign advert here: http://bit.ly/2v5f4lg

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Statistics

The Pre-Crash report 2008 to 2012 on motorcyclists fatalities found:

  • Speed a contributory factor in 49% of the 93 fatal collisions involving a motorcyclist
  • 54% of the fatal collisions involving a motorcyclist occurred in an 80km/h speed zone
  • 98% of the motorcyclists who were deemed culpable for the collision were male. Half of the motorcyclists deemed culpable for the collision were aged between 25 and 34 years old. The average age was 32 years ranging from 16 to 78 years